In order to provide a forum to discuss mathematic education, instruction, and related topics, we have decided to form a new Teaching & Learning Seminar. For the Spring 2017 quarter, Stepan Paul will be organizing the seminar, and questions can sent to his email: spaul@math.ucsb.edu.

Spring 2017

Meetings will take place Mondays 12:00-1:00 PM in South Hall 6635.

Date Speaker Title & Abstract
Mon., Apr. 3
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., Apr. 10
12:00pm, SH-6635
Sherilyn Tamagawa Understanding Academic Dishonesty

We have all observed students cheating in our classes at some point. After a particularly interesting quarter, I decided to research what the literature has to say about academic dishonesty, beyond our teatime anecdotes. I'll share my findings with you, including some concrete (and some less concrete) things you can do to reduce cheating on your next exam.

Mon., Apr. 17
12:00pm, SH-6635
Danielle Champney
(Cal Poly)
Students' Perceptions of the Disciplinary Appropriateness of their Approximation Strategies

One interest of interdisciplinary research and instruction is students' application of knowledge and skills from one discipline to another. I will share work that I have done with several colleagues on this issue, in the context of Taylor Series expansions as approximations, in the disciplines of mathematics and physics. Through semi-structured interviews, we illustrate the context dependence of student reasoning about these approximations - Specifically the ways in which students' notions of the two disciplines drive how they engage in and reflect on the practice of approximating.

Therefore, we argue that "approximation" is reasoned about differently in ways that are tied to the students' notions of the two disciplines themselves. Toward this end, I will speak not only to how students reason with approximation differently, but also why students reason differently with the concept of approximation across these disciplinary contexts.

Mon., Apr. 24
3:30pm, SH-6635

Dave Morrison, Catherine Pfaff, Peter Garfield, Lisa Berry
Teaching Statement Panel

(Joint seminar with Hypatian Seminar. Note the unusual time.) Our panel will discuss the process of writing an effective teaching statement for an academic job. The panelists will introduce themselves, the moderators will ask some questions, and there will be opportunity for questions from the audience.

Mon., May 1
12:00pm, SH-6635
Teaching Ideas Worth Sharing

In this seminar, we will have four ten-minute mini-presentations from grad students and faculty who want to share innovative things they are doing in their classrooms. In addition to in-class lessons, we invite people to share assignments, test questions, and structural elements of their courses that colleagues may find interesting. Time will be reserved after each mini-talk for questions and feedback from the audience.

Mon., May 8
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., May 15
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., May 22
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., May 29
12:00pm, SH-6635
No Meeting

Mon., Jun. 5
12:00pm, SH-6635

Winter 2017

Meetings will take place Mondays 12:00-1:00 PM in South Hall 6635.

Date Speaker Title & Abstract
Mon., Jan. 9
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., Jan. 16
12:00pm, SH-6635
No Meeting

Mon., Jan. 23
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., Jan. 30
12:00pm, SH-6635
Ebrahim Ebrahim
Peter Garfield
Stepan Paul
Teaching Ideas Worth Sharing

In this seminar, we will have four ten-minute mini-presentations from grad students and faculty who want to share innovative things they are doing in their classrooms. In addition to in-class lessons, we invite people to share assignments, test questions, and structural elements of their courses that colleagues may find interesting. Time will be reserved after each mini-talk for questions and feedback from the audience. Below are this week's speakers and topics.
 
Ebrahim Ebrahim: Report from STEM Essentials Workshop
Peter Garfield: Getting Students to Office Hours
Stepan Paul: Using Projects to Extend Coverage

Mon., Feb. 6
12:00pm, SH-6635
Stepan Paul and Monica Mendoza Student Conceptions of 3D Solids

In the study presented in this paper, the authors aim to construct a model for the processes by which students in a multivariable calculus class conceptualize solid regions in three dimensions. We designed and recorded student work from several tasks in which students must decode a de- scription of a solid figure and answer questions assessing the strength of their conception of the figure. Presented here are findings from the analysis interviews and group work on one of these tasks in which students are asked to build a clay model of the solid region described by a set of inequalities in three variables.

Mon., Feb. 13
12:00pm, SH-6635
Chris Ograin Expected competencies in mathematics for all students

Quantitative reasoning is important for success in college and in the workplace. The expectations we have for our mathematics students is changing, and educators at all levels need to understand how to meet the needs of their students in this area. Computational and procedural knowledge will no longer suffice for the types of skills we want students to demonstrate. The talk will center around expectations for mathematics students especially in light of the emergence of Common Core.

Mon., Feb. 20
12:00pm, SH-6635
No Meeting

Mon., Feb. 27
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., Mar. 6
12:00pm, SH-6635

Mon., Mar. 13
12:00pm, SH-6635

Fall 2016

Meetings will take place Thursdays 1:00-2:00 PM in South Hall 4607.

Date Speaker Title & Abstract
Thu., Oct. 6
1:00pm, SH-4607
Stepan Paul What goes on in an inquiry-oriented class?

The terms "inquiry-based learning" and "active learning" in mathematics refer to a framework of instruction in which student-centered activities are used to promote active engagement with the mathematical content of the course during class time. So what does this style of instruction look like? I will talk a bit about the history and context of inquiry-based learning (including the recent call by the CBSM for inclusion of active learning in post-secondary education), and also about my own particular implementation of active learning in Math 4AI, 4BI, and 6AI.

Thu., Oct. 13
1:00pm, SH-4607
Sherilyn Tamagawa
Casey Blacker
Rosalie Carlson
Nancy Scherich
Teaching Ideas Worth Sharing

In this seminar, we will have four ten-minute mini-presentations from grad students and faculty who want to share innovative things they are doing in their classrooms. In addition to in-class lessons, we invite people to share assignments, test questions, and structural elements of their courses that colleagues may find interesting. Time will be reserved after each mini-talk for questions and feedback from the audience. Below are this week's speakers and topics.
 
Sherilyn Tamagawa: Computer programming assignments
Casey Blacker: Debate in Math 8
Rosalie Carlson: Soliciting Questions
Nancy Scherich: Teaching the concept of a set

Thu., Oct. 20
1:00pm, SH-4607
Nathaniel Schley What kind of math does a teacher-teacher teach?

Teaching Math 100 over the summer.

Thu. Oct. 27
1:00pm, SH-4607
No meeting

Thu., Nov. 3
1:00pm, SH-4607
Stepan Paul 3D printing in a multivariable calculus classroom

Because 3D printing technology is fast becoming more affordable and accessible, calculus instructors can now consider using 3D printing and 3D printed models to actively engage students in core concepts relating to objects in R^3. In this talk, I will give some examples how I have incorporated 3D printing into Math 6AI. My emphasis will be on using 3D printing not just for demostration, but also for student interaction. I will also give some idea of the nut and bolds involved in designing and printing 3D models.

Thu., Nov. 10
1:00pm, SH-4607

Thu., Nov. 17
1:00pm, SH-4607

Thu., Nov. 24
1:00pm, SH-4607

Thu., Dec. 1
1:00pm, SH-4607

Thu., Dec. 8
1:00pm, SH-4607